January 31, 2018

Thursday, June 21st

8:00 – 10:15

EXHIBIT HALL E

MORNING KEYNOTE

INTRODUCTION OF MAYOR WHEELER

George Granger
President – Oregon
AT&T

WELCOMING REMARKS

Ted Wheeler
Mayor
City of Portland

EXHIBIT HALL E

CITY LIGHTING PITCHES

Amanda Aizlewood
Assistant Director of Policy – Smart Cities Challenge
Infrastructure Canada

Stephen Wu
Manager – -Economic Development
City of Surrey

Peter Leathley
Sr. Program Manager- Digital Infrastructure & Assets
City of Vancouver

Anne Hill
Program Development
PBOT – City of Portland

Kevin Martin
Smart City PDX/Tech Services Manager
City of Portland – Bureau of Planning & Sustainability

Rosana Wong
Founder & Chairperson – Urban.Systems Company Limited
Vice President – Smart City Consortium

Hyejoo Kim
Big Data Business Unit. Master PM Director
Korea Telecom

10:15 – 10:30

NETWORKING BREAK

10:30 – Noon

EXHIBIT HALL E

KEYNOTE PANEL

FINANCING SMART CITY PROJECTS

This panel will discuss different approaches to financing smart city projects, with an emphasis on private sources of funding.  From crowdfunding, to venture capital, to community trusts, panelists will provide examples of successful projects, break down how to structure deals, and explore some of the latest financing vehicles available to communities and companies operating in this space. 

MODERATOR

Skip Newberry
President & CEO
Technology Association of Oregon

PANELISTS
 

John Haines
Executive Director Community Investment Trust
Mercy Corps Northwest

Kent Lucas
Managing Partner
30X

Tore Steen
President & CEO

CrowdStreet
 

Noon – 1:00

EXHIBIT HALL E

NETWORKING LUNCH

Boxed lunches will be available following the Keynote Panel.

1:00 – 2:00

E147

SECURE SMART CITY ROUNDTABLE

Smart City Implementers: What Have You Learned and What Are Your Cybersecurity and Privacy Challenges?

Adnan Baykal
Global Technical Advisor
Global Cyber Alliance

Maryam Rahmani
Global Partnership Officer
Global Cyber Alliance

GCTC Cybersecurity and Privacy Advisory Committee will conduct a roundtable discussion with smart city implementers and hear the challenges and successes on smart city implementations. Mr. Baykal has facilitated multiple such roundtables nationally and worldwide. Participants will learn from each other’s experiences and take home many aha moments as well as beneficial connections. Furthermore, the roundtable will inform the development of the Cybersecurity and Privacy supporting framework, ultimately benefiting smart city implementers around the world.

1:30 – 2:30

BREAKOUT SESSIONS ONE

E141

This panel will explore last mile transit solutions including micro-transit, Bike, and walking. It will discuss multi-modal solutions and how to coordinate mutli-modal fleets.

MODERATOR

Ken Montler
CEO, Mobility Cubed

PANELISTS

Brett Dodson
Director -Tram, Transportation and Parking
OHSU

Wes Geisenberger
Citizen Experience & Smart City Solutions
Oracle

Kent Lucas
Managing Partner
30X

Chris Nielsen
Founder & CEO
Electric Cab North America

E142

This panel will discuss navigating current local, state, federal, and global policies and what policies/regulations are needed and explore why cooperative governance and mutual trust are essential in advancing smart transportation solutions.

MODERATOR

Geoffrey Urbach
Senior Associate
Summit Strategies

PANELISTS

Carlos M. Braceras, P.E.
Executive Director
Utah Department of Transportation

Nathan Giles
Global Cities-North American Practice Lead
Accenture

Rani Narula-Woods
Sr. Director – Special Projects
Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority

E143

This session considers how communities can be planned and governed in the face of disruptive change using data-informed solutions. Meaningful and purposeful governance models are pragmatic ways to set objectives and monitor success in creating communities that are more responsive, agile, and inclusive and can address complex issues such as climate volatility, depleted public funding, autonomous vehicles, and gentrification. This concept is based on connecting occupants with integrated data – modeled on Smart City Technology from Japan and Open Space Planning from the U.S. – to build community capacity to sustain themselves in more responsive neighborhoods. This regenerative urbanism approach is foundational to shape neighborhoods and cities so that they create more benefits than impacts.

MODERATOR & SPEAKER

Stan Curtis
VP Platform Development
Urban Systems

Measuring the Right Outcomes
Framing the role of data and neighborhood design to promote community health and wellness.

SPEAKERS

John Teeter
CIO
Maalka

Connecting Communities
Presenting the ways data helps communities act in their own interest such that the physical environment in buildings and across districts helps occupants make wise and healthful choices.

Charles Kelley
Principal
ZGF Architects

Making Meaningful and Purposeful Improvements
Presenting ways that cities can be improved to address social mobility and human health via savings in resource use through transformed urban places.

E144

Distributed ledger technology (DLT), most recently associated with the explosion of blockchain technologies like Bitcoin and Etherium, is driving a lot of current thinking around the application of decentralized systems to civic environments. To frame the conversation, we’ll have a quick review of what distributed ledgers are, and how they impact Smart Cities from a technical, economic and political perspective.

Next we’ll explore potential use cases and applications of the technology in a Smart Cities context. From communities that are merely interested in dipping their toe in the blockchain waters to communities that have already jumped in, all are welcome. We will also have some subject matter experts from around the world joining via video.

The session will be as interactive, so expect to gain actionable insights.

MODERATOR

Nathan DiNiro
Co-Founder & VP of Marketing
YouBase

PRESENTERS

 
Michael Murray
Independent Researcher & Innovation Officer
PHSI Health Service Executive Ireland

E145

NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Direction (ARMD), Urban Air Mobility (UAM) in conjunction with NIST and the Smart Cities Transportation Supercluster management will be discussing the latest status, goals, and collaboration exploration objectives of the Urban Air Mobility initiative. 

MODERATOR

Yuri Gawdiak
AOSP Associate Director for Portfolio & Systems Analysis
NASA

E146

This Symposium will provide a leading venue for the presentation of the highest-quality original research, groundbreaking ideas, and compelling insights on future trends in Smart City Technology and Deployment.

Identifying Critical Issues in Smart City Big Data Project Implementation

Identifying Critical Issues in Smart City Big Data Project Implementation

Husam Barham
Graduate Research & Teaching Assistant
Portland State University

Challenges and Opportunities in Transportation Data

Kristin Tufte
Assistant Professor – Research
Portland State University

3:00 – 4:00

BREAKOUT SESSIONS TWO

E141

This panel will explore the impact of Connected Electric Vehicles (CAV) on last mile transit solutions and the built environment.

MODERATOR

Ken Montler
CEO, Mobility Cubed

PANELISTS

Phil Mann
VP of Sales
Humatics

Adrian Pearmine
National Director for Smart Cities and Connected Vehicles
DKS Associates

Jeanette Shaw
Director of Government Affairs
Forth

Rosana Wong
Founder & Chairperson – Urban.Systems Company Limited
Vice President – Smart City Consortium

E144

The emergence and continued evolution of smart cities are providing a wealth of benefits to our communities, but with these advancements come the requirement to meet the security demands of advanced technology and increased connectivity.  Research indicates that malware, ransomware, and denial of service attacks are the threats that top the concerns of the professionals seeking to keep the smart city’s citizens secure and safe while also ensuring that city management, governance, services and infrastructure as also protected and functioning.  Looking at just the transportation sector, often cited as being the most critical and threatened, it becomes immediately apparent that it relies on a complex assembly of infrastructures, IT, OT, automation, and various manual controls and human interactions.  In addition, the mobile nodes on the transportation network, the vehicles themselves, are becoming increasingly interactive, networked, autonomous, and complex systems-of-systems in their own right.  The impact of any of the previously listed threats on smart city transportation has the potential for severe or even catastrophic effects.  Cities are then presented with the challenge of how to adequately protect the transportation system given the financial, physical, and functional realities that exist.  How can we better inform policy makers and stakeholders in order to strategically improve cyber security design, procurement, governance, and management?  How can risk mitigation be enhanced and improved?  Are there measureable and objective metrics that can aid decisions and verify effectiveness?  In this panel, we will discuss a variety of approaches; test beds, tailored vulnerability assessments (including vehicles), modeling and simulation, etc. and how employ these approaches to empower risk management initiatives that would result in more efficient, effective, and affordable cybersecurity.

MODERATOR

Katie Wolf
Project Manager
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

PANELISTS

Isaac Potoczny-Jones
CEO

Tozny

Shawn Rickets
Manager
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Scott Tousley, Deputy Director, Cyber Security Division
US Department of Homeland Security

E143

This session considers how communities can be planned and governed in the face of disruptive change using data-informed solutions. Meaningful and purposeful governance models are pragmatic ways to set objectives and monitor success in creating communities that are more responsive, agile, and inclusive and can address complex issues such as climate volatility, depleted public funding, autonomous vehicles, and gentrification. This concept is based on connecting occupants with integrated data – modeled on Smart City Technology from Japan and Open Space Planning from the U.S. – to build community capacity to sustain themselves in more responsive neighborhoods. This regenerative urbanism approach is foundational to shape neighborhoods and cities so that they create more benefits than impacts.

MODERATOR & SPEAKER

Stan Curtis
VP Platform Development
Urban Systems

Measuring the Right Outcomes
Framing the role of data and neighborhood design to promote community health and wellness.

SPEAKERS

John Teeter
CIO
Maalka

Connecting Communities
Presenting the ways data helps communities act in their own interest such that the physical environment in buildings and across districts helps occupants make wise and healthful choices.

Charles Kelley
Principal
ZGF Architects

Making Meaningful and Purposeful Improvements
Presenting ways that cities can be improved to address social mobility and human health via savings in resource use through transformed urban places.

4:00

EXHIBIT HALL E

WeGO – HONG KONG TRADE & DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL RECEPTION

World Smart Sustainable Cities Organization (WeGO), an international organization of cities and local governments that pursues sustainable urban development based on e-Government and ICT, and Hong Kong Trade & Development Council, who showcase the strengths of Hong Kong services sector to the world, encouraging overseas and mainland companies to utilize Hong Kong’s services platform, invite you to join them a reception in the Exhibition Hall.

Network with other Global Tech Jam attendees, and speak with presenters from the official Poster Session, enjoy appetizers and a no-host bar.

EXHIBIT HALL E

POSTER SESSION

In separating the communication channel from the power line, the desired redundancy comes at the price of the alternative channel. Project GRACE secures the smart meters while leveraging the public (wireless) networks and reaping the benefits of sharing.

Kang Wei Woo

Nobuiro Wantanbe

Shivakumar Mathapathi

Billy Zhao

What is the definition of Intelligence? There are no consistent definition of Intelligence. For example, Are plants intelligent? Are Animals Intelligent? Are Dolphins more intelligent than Humans? Answers to these questions depend on the perspective. Defining intelligence is hard. How can we build intelligence into anything when we can’t define Intelligence well?

There are two ways to explore this complex topic of Intelligence:
A) A practical, engineering-centric approach
B) A theoretical or philosophical approach.
We take a practical approach to defining Intelligence and show how to build intelligence into anything. Intelligence is a system that requires three essential elements
1. Sensing
2. Responding
3. Overall Optimization

We take a technical view of each of these elements and deep dive into “Optimization” aspect of Intelligence. We argue “optimization” as the most critical piece of an intelligent system. While the popular press and marketing noise is about self driving cars, smart cities and other intelligent systems, machine learning technology is the workhorse behind scenes. We discuss current state of the art in Machine Learning systems. We share our practical experience with large scale machine learning and challenges of parallelism both at model and data level.

Vinay Rao

This presentation outlines the current research at PNNL on transportation systems research, where the transportation system can be represented as a three layers operational control system. The top layer stands for the system operational central controls, the middle layer is composed of all the concerned intersection signal control systems over a urban area and the bottom layers are for the individual vehicles. The functionalities of the intersection layers are to smooth traffic flows via signal timing control and the vehicle layer means for enhanced fuel economy indexes via powertrain and aftertreatment systems control. Our research has been focused on intersection signal control using stochastic distribution control theory originated by Wang many years ago. For vehicle level control we are working on co-optimization of integrated powertrain and aftertreatment systems using V2V and V2I information so as to enhance the fuel economy. These two areas of work are funded by DoE Vehicle Technology office and DoE ARPA – E nextCar program, in collaboration with ORNL, NREL, University of Michigan and San Diego State University, and also funded by PNNL LDRD scheme.

Jianming Lian

To assess the potential to reduce the harmful effects of traffic fuel consumption a framework for Environmental Traffic Assignment (E-TAP) is presented; that is a methodology for allocating traffic flows on a road network with the objective of minimizing objective functions related to energy such as fuel consumption or traffic pollutants. The underlying minimization problem in E-TAP is characterized and studied for uniqueness. The considered minimization problem is framed along the well-known Wardrop’s principles to develop two cases: 1) a User Equilibrium (UE) case that assumes selfish-routing of individuals and 2) a Social Optimal (SO) case that obtains the minimized solution for the entire system. The framework is illustrated via a case study application of E-TAP for the greater Los Angeles area. The E-TAP results are compared and contrasted to traditional travel-time based traffic assignment.

Aziz Khiyami
PhD Candidate – Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of California Berkeley

Christopher Giossi

6:00

REVOLUTION HALL

HACK OREGON DEMO DAY
REVOLUTION HALL – NE PORTLAND

Hack Oregon is a Portland based nonprofit and Smart Cities program focused on building data-driven software to address important themes in the public interest.They will be unveiling five new story collections on the CIVIC platform, an open data portal built by Hack Oregon. 2018 Themes Include: Disaster Resilience, Transportation Systems, Affordable Housing, Neighborhood Development and Local Elections.

Please note that this event is separately ticketed from Global Tech Jam. General Admission tickets are FREE, but space is limited. Proceeds from VIP ticket sales directly support Hack Oregon volunteers.

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