2019 Agenda

Global Tech Jam invites participants to learn from leaders in industry, communities, and government agencies.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10th

WELCOME - ARENA

11:00 am

PLENARY SESSIONS - ARENA

9:15 am

Attorney General
State of Oregon

Founder, DocuSign
Investment Partner, Seven Peaks Ventures

New Economy
Future of Work
Global Citizenship

President, Nortal LLC
Executive Vice President, Nortal Group

10:15 am

Challenge-based procurement puts the full innovative force of the private sector to work for the public good. Governments can start by describing their challenge instead of trying to define the ideal solution. Companies everywhere can submit standardized proposals to government challenges, even if a perfect product doesn’t exist yet.  

The Results:

  • More rapid innovation
  • New opportunities for emerging technology companies
  • Fewer change orders and schedule overruns
  • Better fitting solutions for governments

Major Themes:

  • Tackle Problem You Don’t Know How to Solve
    Create an open-ended solicitation and choose a partner with the greatest potential to solve your challenge, so the quality of your solution isn’t limited by your team’s technical knowledge or expertise.

  • Get Better Solutions
    Create solicitations that communicate performance-based requirements before signing a contract. Get competitive bids from companies eager to solve your challenges. 

  • Access New Technology and Talent
    Don’t settle for legacy solutions that may not meet your needs. Lower the barrier to entry for small and growing businesses to increase the diversity of solutions in your vendor pool. 

CEO
Marketplace.city

Principal Legislative IT Analyst
Oregon Legislative Fiscal Office

Chief Information Security Officer
Multnomah County, Oregon

11:00 am

Municipal organizations and their collaborating institutions have an opportunity to take advantage of open source software development approaches and institutional constructs to improve outcomes, reduce cost, increase collaboration and reduce silos of software projects in and between cities.   This session will be informational and interactive with attendees on the uses of the Open Source Program Office in the municipal context; Open Source, Open Data, InnerSource, Municipal Source.  

Founder
Mosslabs.io
Municipal Open Source Software

Manager of Data Services
Johns Hopkins University

Executive Vice President
urban.systems

Director, Open@ADSK
Autodesk

Executive Director
Hack Oregon

11:45 am

Thomas Doherty
Clinical & Organizational Psychologist
Sustainable Self

Jonathan Fink
Director
PSU Digital Testbed Center

Jacob Green
Founder
Mosslabs.io
Municipal Open Source Software


Jean Rice
Senior Program Specialist
National Telecommunications & Information Administration (NTIA)

Joe Cortright

Katherine Wolf

Adrian Permine

12:15 pm

For the success of Smart Secure Cities and Communities Challenge, we’ll want to have more women participating in the Challenge in all roles including leadership positions.  This session builds on powerful observation, recognition and recommendations by men and women during the July Expo in Washington DC, and explores practical ways to make a difference in our initiative.  

CEO
Adaptable Security

Co-Chair
NIST SC3 GCTC Supercluster on Data
C0-Founder
Aspen.ai

Portfolio Manager, Cyber Security Division, Science & Technology Directorate
U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Director of SMC Public Wi-Fi
County of San Mateo

Associate Director for Cyber-Physical Systems Innovation
National Institute of Standards and Technology

Senior Director, Smart Buildings Program
Telecommunications Industry Association

BREAKOUT SESSIONS 1

1:15 - 2:00 pm

THRIVING COMMUNITIES TRACK - ROOM 128

Clinical & Organizational Psychologist
Sustainable Self

Founder
Metropolitan Intelligence

Principal Management Analyst
City of Portland

1:15 - 3:00 pm

DATA TRACK - ROOM 122

Municipal organizations have an opportunity to take advantage of open source software development approaches to improve outcomes and reduce costs of software projects (inner source). This session will explore challenges to using these techniques and actions that can be taken to accelerate adoption.

Founder
Mosslabs.io
Municipal Open Source Software

Manager of Data Services
Johns Hopkins University

Executive Vice President
urban.systems

Director, Open@ADSK
Autodesk

Executive Director
Hack Oregon

REGIONAL TRACK - ROOM 138

Connectivity and Innovation are helping ensure rural prosperity and will improve farming and ranching production, economic development, health outcomes, educational availability and aging in place. The Agriculture and Rural SuperCluster (ARSC), GCTC -Smart and Secure Cities and Communities Challenge, encourages collaboration on innovative ag tech projects. At this panel participants will see a virtual “tour of the SuperCluster” activities.

Director, Community Broadband Initiative
Joint Venture Silicon Valley

Economic Development Director
City of Independence

Vice President of Policy
NTCA–The Rural Broadband Association

Telecommunications Director
NoaNet

Smart Connection Consulting

ECONOMIC TRACK - 132

Cities are complex social and economic systems; technology is one component that interacts with other aspects of these systems. Historically, the introduction of new technologies, (in the past, like the streetcar and automobile), has profoundly re-shaped the urban environment. Like their predecessors, smart city technology and new transport modes (from e-scooters to AVs, and beyond), will likely have a range of intended and unintended consequences.

This panel will look at some current issues in urban transportation, and reflect on how changing technology will interact city residents as consumers and system users, with businesses and with existing policies and institutions. How can we recognize the limitations and take advantage of the opportunities that new technology creates to address the big challenges facing our cities?

Economist, Impresa
President, City Observatory

Senior Fellow & Senior Researcher
Sighline Institute

Senior Fellow
American Leadership Forum of Oregon

TRANSPORTATION & MOBILITY TRACK - ROOM 124

Open Data Standards such as Global Transit Feed Specification (GTFS), Bikeshare Feed Specification and most recently Mobility Data Specification (MDS) have allowed agencies and private sector companies to work together to develop transit and transportation system applications that have been beneficial to a wide range of users.  Platforms such as Open Trip Planner and Open Street Maps have supported a growing community of solutions across the globe.

Come discuss lessons learned on developing and deploying “Big and Open” Data solutions for city transportation networks with public and private partners.

CIO
TriMet

Research Scientist and Group Manager
Pacific Northwest National Laborator

ACM SYMPOSIUM 10 PAPERS - ROOM 122

Sebastian Barillaro
Raghu Kacker
Sokwoo Rhee
Gustavo Escudero
Mark Lee Badger
D. Richard Kuhn

2:15 - 3:00 pm

THRIVING COMMUNITIES TRACK - ROOM 128

Clinical & Organizational Psychologist
Sustainable Self

Equity & Inclusion Manager
Multnomah County

Technology Consultant/CTO
Fundamental Fitness Labs

HR Consultant & Executive Director
Coalition of Black Men

Vice Chair
Multnomah Democratic Party

President
The Black Community of Portland

BREAKOUT SESSIONS 2

3:15 - 4:00 pm

THRIVING COMMUNITIES TRACK - ROOM 128

Clinical & Organizational Psychologist
Sustainable Self

Associate Professor
Ball State University

Smart Citizen Bill of Rights for People-Centered Services

President & CTO
People Power Company

Going Beyond Smart Homes that Take Care of People

Founder & Chief Creative Officer
Amplified by Design


More than Empathy: Addressing Social Isolation, Equity and Inclusion in the Digital Age

Atlantic Fellow for Equity in Brain Health
Global Brain Health Institute
University of California, San Francisco

3:15 - 5:00 pm

DATA TRACK - ROOM 126

Opening government data increases citizen participation in government, creates opportunities for economic development, and informs decision making in both the private and public sectors. This session explores how cities are adopting open data practices and the challenges of curating that data for broad citizen and research use.

ECONOMIC TRACK - ROOM 132

Portland General Electric (PGE) and their regional partner Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) have a proven scalable, efficient Electrification capability that is recognized globally as Decarbonizing transportation fleets (EV33) and community development (Living Building Challenge).
 
This panel discusses key scenarios in development programs, and discusses the challenges for configuring business partnerships that are comply with local regulatory models and are scalable, premium services for Metro adoption.

Co-Founder & VP Platform Development
OPENcommons :: urban.systems

Real Estate Market Manager
Portland General Electric

Vice President
Schneider Electric

Developer
Eagle Landing

President
V3 Studios Otak

TRANSPORTATION & MOBILITY TRACK - ROOM 124

Seemingly emerging out of nowhere, Scooters have joined the expanding selection of a new form of transportation often referred to as “micromobility.”  While only a small part of a full transportation ecosystem, scooters have nonetheless demonstrated rapid acceptance and tremendous growth in a very short time.  While some argue this may be a fad, many think that scooters offer an important, equitable, first and last mile solution.  And while there are some arguments about the viability of the business model and the environmental friendliness (when considering lifecycle of the equipment), many argue that scooters are here to stay and we should be exploring safe approaches to deploying this technology.

National Director for Smart Cities and Connected Vehicles
DKS Associates

City of Eugene
University of Oregon UrbanismNext

Senior Manager, Government Partnership
Bird

National laboratories have extensive research programs focused on advancing scientific and technical expertise related to energy and mobility, and safe, efficient, and affordable transportation futures, with the goal of decarbonizing transportation and reducing the vehicle emissions for healthier urban environments.  With approximately 30% of the nation’s energy consumption and carbon emissions being tied to transportation, advancements in smart mobility integrated into smart cities concepts are likely to improve safety of transportation and result in a higher degree of livability in US cities, while meeting the mobility needs of a 21st century urban society.  Today’s panel is comprised of scientists representing Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Oakridge National Laboratory, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.  Panelists will provide an overview of their lab’s missions and capabilities as it relates to transportation, mobility, and the urban sciences, and share their thoughts on how emerging capabilities can advance state and regional priorities related to smart cities adoptions, and how industry can connect with the labs.   Panelists are encouraged to discuss current data challenges for modeling, planning, and decision support in transportation systems, privacy concerns and the role of AI in the future of data-driven mobility, smart cities data curation, and public safety, and the relationship between policy and technology.

Research Scientist and Group Manager
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Mobility Researcher
National Renewal Energy Laborator

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Vehicle and Mobility Group Manager
Argonne National Laboratory

ACM SYMPOSIUM 10 PAPERS - ROOM 122

Isaac Potoczny-Jones
Erin Kenneally
John Ruffing

Hector Dominguez
Judith Mowry
Elisabeth Perez
Christine Kendrick
Kevin Martin

REGIONAL - ROOM 138

With major regional distribution facilities for Amazon and Fed-Ex located on-site, the Troutdale Airport represents an excellent facility for testing and deploying next-generation energy, aerial and terrestrial mobility solutions and infrastructure related to the movement of freight.  This will be a facilitated discussion involving local and national stakeholders to learn about existing assets located at the facility and identify potential projects.

4:15 - 5:00 pm

THRIVING COMMUNITIES TRACK - 128

Clinical & Organizational Psychologist
Sustainable Self

Strategic Communications
Marcus Consulting Group

Bringing Smart Cities to the People — Smart Cities Diaries

Smart Cities Policy Advisor
Cincinnati Bell

Smart City Strategies for Placemaking, the Arts, and Main Street Revitalization

Partner, Director of Design Experience & Strategy
Amplified by Design

Design for Enchantment: Amplifying the Human Experience in Smart Cities

5:00 - 7:00 pm

EXHIBITION & POSTER RECEPTION - CONCOURSE

Network with attendees and visit our exhibition sponsors and poster representatives.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11th

WELCOME - ARENA

PLENARY SESSIONS - ARENA

9:15 am

Panelists in two Cascadia sessions  will share their experiences of developing smart city projects in metropolitan Portland, Seattle and Vancouver. Cultural, political and socio-economic similarities among the three metros encourage the transfer of innovations across the megaregion. In addition, three urban-based universities–Portland State University (PSU), University of Washington (UW) and University of British Columbia (UBC)–have built robust smart city partnerships with their host cities, including student internships and research collaborations using campus testbeds, providing another avenue for information exchange.

The Cascadia discussion will be previewed in a Wednesday morning “smart regions” plenary session by Brandon Lee (Canadian Consul General and Senior Digital Strategist), Skip Newberry (President of Tech Association of Oregon), and Jonathan Fink (PSU Digital City Testbed Center Director).

Senior Program Specialist
NTIA

Director
Portland State University Digital City Testbed Center

Consul General of Canada

President & CEO
Technology Association of Oregon

The Global Cities Team Challenge Smart State Initiative was kicked off this year by NTIA, NIST and the National Governors Association. As part of this initiative, this panel will highlight how the state of Oregon is focusing on using on fundamentals related to being a smart state and supporting smart cities. We will discuss Oregons role developing authoritative, accessible State data and promoting the development an use of broadband in rural areas, including smart agriculture. We will also cover what a few other states are pursuing in this area.

Senior Program Specialist
National Telecommunications & Information Administration (NTIA)

Chief Data Officer
State of Oregon

Telecommunications Strategist, Oregon Broadband Office
Business Oregon

LIGHTNING TALKS

10:15 am

John Ruffing
Business Development
Esri

Single family zoning laws are changing throughout all cities in Oregon with a population size of 10k and up.  These new Up-zoning changes are needing a modernized (smart city) approach for solutions to view, analyze, design, support decision-making and help communicate to the public during these times of dramatic changes taking place.  Designing with a modernized 3D representation of a city will help gain contextual information to assess analytical representations of these zoning code changes to measure impacts, planning scenarios, improved productivity and increase community engagement.

Clinical & Organizational Psychologist
Sustainable Self

This talk describes a model for Smart Cities initiatives to directly improve community wellbeing and quality of life. These include programs that foster health and wellness across the lifespan, sustainability and beneficial connections with the natural environment, vibrant arts and cultural expression, and equity and shared prosperity. The model predicts that successful programs will recognize and address empirical determinants of health, community needs and culture, ethical questions, security and interoperability, and user experience.

Ondrej Sklenar
Project Manager
Herrera Environmental Consultants

We will examine cities from a civil engineer’s perspective and discuss how design and infrastructure challenges are solved through data analytics and visualization. Examples from the rapidly growing field of public urban data will be discussed to show how new insights can be gained into our cities. From data on airplane traffic noise, building energy use, urban trees, and multimodal traffic counts, there is great promise in developing new tools and applications for understanding and improving our cities. Examples from a wide array of data sources will set the stage for a discussion on how software developers and data scientists can solve urban challenges that are currently out of reach for engineering, planning, and architectural professionals.

Benjamin Ng
CEO
AmerAsia Technologies Inc 

  • To Impact the Public Safety & Security Industry in North America with our Proven Innovative Platform. 
  • We are focused on maximum effective response to secure the grounds for all.
  • We bring together partners with industry leading technology that leverages off our Platform!

John Saez
Smart City Business Development Lead
NTT

NTT is working with cities, campuses and large enterprises throughout the world to improve the lives of citizens and employees by accelerating the implementation of smart technologies, using solutions as diverse as the cities and citizens we serve. We started by designing an agile, robust Smart Platform of information and communications technology systems that combine capabilities to make a “smart” safety solution. This Smart Platform serves as a technology engine behind the scenes gathering input from a variety of sources and devices. The Smart Platform “thinks” and can assess multiple data sources, perceive current conditions, and plan, decide and act on those conditions. Our versatile Smart Platform has proven useful in helping cities improve safety and use their data more effectively to make informed decisions.

The built-in flexibility of our Smart Platform offers a wide variety of uses cases for cities — from traffic monitoring and crowd management to public safety and data monetization. Our smart safety solutions listed below enable safer streets, parks, venues and schools.

Greg Schundler
Infrastructure Management Analyst
City of Portland

Climate Change Action Comparable Cities: What Places in the World are just like mine and what can I learn from them?

Creating a filterable database of places and Project Drawdown Solutions to guide action, activism, and education

PLENARY SESSION

11:15 am

Senior Broadband Program Specialist
National Telecommunications & Information Administration (NTIA)

Director, California Research Bureau
California State Library

Chief Equity Officer
King County, WA

Director of Digital Strategies
Multnomah County Library
Oregon

LIGHTNING TALKS

NOON

Steve Callaway
Mayor
City of Hillsboro

 

Access to high-speed internet service is no longer a luxury, it’s a necessity. The City of Hillsboro is expanding its existing fiber network to provide HiLight: affordable, high-speed internet service for all Hillsboro residents and businesses. Mayor Steve Callaway will detail Hillsboro’s decision to invest in and build this utility, the project’s next steps, and how the affordability of HiLight’s gigabit speeds will improve opportunities for Hillsboro students, families, and businesses.

Mayor Shane Bemis
City of Gresham

As is the case in many cities across the US, the City of Gresham’s wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was its highest municipal consumer of electricity in 2005.  After combining investments in a number of technologies beginning in 2005, the plant became net zero in 2015. Gresham was the first city in the Northwest to achieve that distinction. Today Gresham’s wastewater treatment plant is an energy producer and saves our ratepayers $800,000 annually.

Mark Gamba
Mayor
City of Milwaukie

Denny Doyle
Mayor
City of Beaverton

The City of Beaverton is a dynamic city located in Washington County, Oregon that is working to stay connected to its residents and businesses through innovation and partnerships. The city, in conjunction with Portland General Electric, is developing an advanced micro-grid to ensure a critical facility is fully operational in the face of a disaster. The city is investing in cutting-edge industries focused on big data, digital health, and the internet of things. Finally, the city is partnering with an innovative start-up to foster data-driven decisions with community in mind.

Chuck Bennett
Mayor
City of Salem

As Oregon’s state capital, Salem focuses on environmentally sustainable and fiscally thoughtful solutions to a range of issues. Over the past several years, the City of Salem has made numerous innovative investments in its infrastructure. These diversified investments include a wastewater cogeneration treatment plant, water quality testing, the Green Future Impact program, Electric Avenue, and LED light conversion. Each of these forward-looking investments help make Salem more resilient, environmentally friendly, and cost effective for our customers now and into the future.

BREAKOUT SESSIONS 3

1:15 pm - 2:00 pm

THRIVING COMMUNITIES TRACK - ROOM 122

Senior Broadband Program Specialist
National Telecommunications & Information Administration (NTIA)

Founder and CEO
Computing Kids

Director of Digital Inclusion
City of Detroit

Global Community Manager
Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology

1:15 - 3:00 pm

DATA TRACK - ROOM 126

With the proliferation of new connected services in cities there is an explosion of applications. Many of these applications are based on custom systems that are not interoperable, portable or extensible. NIST and a group of leading standards bodies published the IES-City framework, a distillation of current practices intended to to address these and other challenges including privacy and security. This panel session will discuss these challenges and look at how we can work together to address them.

CEO
urban.systems

Senior Principal Engineer
Intel

Senior Research Scientist
Battelle

NEC Fellow
NEC Corporation

Founder
Tozny

Sokwoo Rhee
Associate Director for Cyber-Physical Systems Innovation

REGIONAL TRACK - ROOM 124

Panelists in two Cascadia sessions will share their experiences of developing smart city projects in metropolitan Portland, Seattle and Vancouver. Cultural, political and socio-economic similarities among the three metros encourage the transfer of innovations across the megaregion. In addition, three urban-based universities–Portland State University (PSU), University of Washington (UW) and University of British Columbia (UBC)–have built robust smart city partnerships with their host cities, including student internships and research collaborations using campus testbeds, providing another avenue for information exchange.

This panel will focus on city-city collaborations in the public and private sectors.

Consul General Brandon Lee will lead off by talking about the role of the Canadian consulate in Seattle and similar organizations like Challenge Seattle and Greater Portland Inc in coordinating a regional-scale, tech-savvy policy agenda.

Kevin Martin, Smart City Manager for the City of Portland will give a few examples of “Smart PDX” projects and mention how these have been informed by (and inform) work in Seattle, Vancouver and other forefront cities.

Portland Bureau of Transportation Interim Assistant Director Noah Siegel will discuss how technology may–or may not–be able to help resolve some of Portland’s and the region’s major transportation policy issues.

Finally, Charles Kelley from ZGF Architects in Portland will describe how a Cascadia-based global architecture firm contributes to the emergence of a regional development strategy that is responsive to local values and challenges. Each of the four panelists will give a 5- to 10-minute introduction, followed by a moderated discussion and then Q&A with the audience.

Pricipal
ZFG Architects

Consul General of Canada

Smart City PDX Manager
City of Portland Bureau of Planning & Sustainability

Interim Deputy Director
Portland Bureau of Transportation

TRANSPORTATION & MOBILITY TRACK - ROOM 128

Ease of mobility has become a serious factor influencing the livability of urban spaces. Developing data-informed, sustainable mobility and transportation plans, policies, and technologies is foundational to urban planning, and essential to improve livability, while ensuring the optimal operation of transportation and other city services.  The following research papers will explore various aspects of data-driven analysis of transportation and mobility networks in urban scenarios, such as multi-scale analysis and modeling, the role of AI, integrated analytics, emergent transportation and mobility paradigms, and more.

Data-driven mobility modeling and prediction forms a very important aspect of modern urban planning. Modeling of freeway links has received disproportionate attention in the transportation research community primarily due to the available of large amounts of data from freeway sensors. While being equally important, the same is not true when it comes to arterial modeling where the coverage is limited due cost issues with installation of large number of probe sensors and associated infrastructure. 

Under these circumstances, significant insights can be gained with datasets such as the Uber Movement data at a fraction of the cost. Uber datasets provide anonymized, aggregated, and coarse-grained origin-destination (O-D) travel times at the TAZ (Traffic Analysis Zone) level. While these datasets can be coarse-grained, they do allow for coverage over large areas and are available for multiple metropolitan areas allowing for generalizability. 

In this work we leverage the Uber movement dataset for the Los Angeles (LA) area where partial TAZ-TAZ trip time data is available. We first create a TAZ-TAZ network based on nearest neighbors and propose a model that allows us to complete the O-D travel time matrix, using optimization methods such as non-negative least squares. We apply these algorithms for several communities in the TAZ-TAZ network and present insights in the form of completed O-D matrices and associated temporal trends. We qualify the error performance and scalability of our flows. We conclude by pointing out the directions in our ongoing work to improve the quality and scale of travel time estimation.

Arun Sathanur
Vinay Amatya
Arif Khan
Robert Rallo
Kelsey Maass

Urban mapping for street-side environments (i.e., sidewalk environments rather than auto-centric ones) is just one of many new applications requiring simultaneous object detection and localization in outdoor scenes. Automated mapping has focused on car environments in support of vehicle travel, though pedestrian infrastructure maps, historical structure maps and recreational trail maps are as important in supporting urban life. Unfortunately, many of the auto-centric automated approaches cannot be leveraged in other outdoor use cases due to challenging and cost-prohibitive depth sensing hardware involving LiDar sensors and large computing resources. Using depth-sensing stereo cameras is cost-efficient, but little information is available detailing the best uses and efficacy of different systems in diverse outdoor environments. Our review highlights the complexity of localizing objects in real outdoor environments using stereo cameras and our comparative analysis approach to two common camera setups demonstrates the variation among depth-sensing cameras. We collect a modest dataset with side-by-side images for comparing two commonly used depth cameras, the ZED Stereo Camera (a passive stereo camera) and Intel® RealSenseTMDepth Camera D435 (an active IR stereo camera). We contrast system performance in diverse urban environments, and provide accuracy of depth measurement results based on data collected from each stereo sensor. We focus our discussion on practical considerations and objects that are commonly presented in the street environment but usually hard to map by hand

Yuxiang Zhang
Anat Caspi

Every major car manufacturer and leading technology company today is pursuing the development of Connected and Autonomous Vehicles (CAVs). However, given cities will be most affected by CAVs, there is an urgent need to assess whether our cities are prepared and will respond well to the advancement in CAV technology. This paper proposes the first readiness index to measure the extent to which current cities are ready for CAVs. We consider three key elements in computing a CAV readiness score: a city’s policies and regulations, its physical infrastructure, and its cyber infrastructure. We identify 16 major factors related to the key elements contributing to a city’s readiness and compute the readiness index as a weighted average of these factors. Moreover, we collected survey responses regarding the importance of each factor from 13 of the most populous US cities. We also selected a metric for quantifying each factor and collected the corresponding data from our survey and existing studies. We then leverage decision trees as a machine learning model to predict 52 major US cities’ readiness for CAVs. While it is difficult to draw general conclusions on our cities’ readiness due to limited data availability, our preliminary study does suggest that there is a big gap between our industry and public’s interest in CAVs and the policy and infrastructure support provided by our cities. Most importantly, we believe that the proposed readiness index provides practical guidelines for policy makers and planners to improve their cities’ policies and infrastructure to facilitate CAVs.

Junaid Ahmed Khan
Lan Wang
Eddie Jacobs
Ahmedraza Talebian
Sabyasachee Mishra
Charles Santo
Michail Gkolias
Carmen Astorne-Figari

Energy consumption in the transportation sector accounts for 28.8% of the total value among all the industry sectors in the United of States, reaching 28.2 quadrillion btu in 2017. Having an accurate evaluation of the vehicle fuel and energy consumption values is a challenging task due to numerous implicit governing factors, such as the variety of powertrain configurations, time-varying traffic and congestion patterns, and emerging new technologies, such as regenerative braking. In this paper, we propose to present a data-driven and model-free computational framework to evaluate the energy impact in the transportation system at different scales, leveraging the scalable high-performance transportation simulator, Mobiliti. Instead of using empirical energy models, we create a deep-neural-network mapping between the fuel and energy consumption rate with a variety of heterogeneous driving conditions based on dynamometer test datasets, real-world drive cycle survey datasets as well as real-world GPS probe datasets. For the dynamic driving behaviors, machine learning algorithms are applied over the real-world drive cycle datasets to identify the dominant features and to cluster the drive cycles into representative groups, which are used to generate high-resolution random drive cycles using a Markov chain approach. Using Mobiliti, both turban-scale static evaluations and dynamic analysis at the trip level can be estimated with a significantly improved fidelity. We demonstrate this approach through case studies with different scales and varied penetrations of different vehicle types, such as conventional ICE vehicles, hybrid vehicles, and electric vehicles.

Bin Wang
Divya Somasi
Jane Macfarlane
Cy Chan

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

SMART BUILDINGS - ROOM 132

Smart buildings are the building blocks of smart cities. They enable energy efficiency, increase productivity of occupants, streamline operations and directly affect ROI of building owners and tenants.  Integrating smart buildings has an exponential impact on the city and town environment in which people live, work and play. This panel will discuss smart buildings uses cases in the municipal environment, and the foundational technologies that support them.

Bring your questions for the open forum Q&A.

Senior Director, Smart Buildings Program
Telecommunications Industry Association

Strategy and Technology- Enterprise PLM
CommScope, Inc.

AOSP Associate Director for Portfolio & Systems Analysis
NASA

Director of SMC Public Wi-Fi
County of San Mateo

Architect & Planner

2:15 pm - 3:00 pm

THRIVING COMMUNITIES TRACK - ROOM 122

This discussion brings together organizations interested in creating high quality telehealth and telemedicine projects connecting urban and rural communities and resources to improve health and wellness outcomes. Challenges and opportunities include health and social equity factors, urban-rural cultural differences, infrastructure such as fiber and wireless assets, security and confidentiality, and personal ownership of data.

Clinical & Organizational Psychologist
Sustainable Self

Executive Vice President, Goverment Relations & Public Affairs
OCHIN, Inc.

Deputy General Counsel
St. Charles Health

Executive Director
LINK Oregon

Chief Strategy Officer
Kiva.org

Representative
State of Oregon

Senior Program Manager
Cincinnati Bell

BREAKOUT SESSIONS 4

3:00 pm - 4:30pm

REGIONAL TRACK - ROOM 124

Panelists in two Cascadia sessions will share their experiences of developing smart city projects in metropolitan Portland, Seattle and Vancouver. Cultural, political and socio-economic similarities among the three metros encourage the transfer of innovations across the megaregion. In addition, three urban-based universities–Portland State University (PSU), University of Washington (UW) and University of British Columbia (UBC)–have built robust smart city partnerships with their host cities, including student internships and research collaborations using campus testbeds, providing another avenue for information exchange.

The second panel session will address city-university partnerships in Seattle, Vancouver, Surrey and Portland.

Jon Fink will give a brief introduction to UBC’s Campus as a Living Lab initiative and PSU’s Digital City Testbed Center (the latter was modeled after the former).

Three representatives from UBC (Professor David Michelson, Parking and Access Services Director Brian Jones and UBC Sustainability Initiative Research Associate Michael Kennedy), along with Dave Harkness (Parking and New Mobility Manager from the City of Surrey) will give several examples of novel tech- and data-oriented projects carried out on the UBC campus with direct relevance to municipal applications.

Bill Howe from UW will then present an overview of results from the UW-UBC Cascadia Urban Analytics Cooperative research program and the associated Data Science for Social Good student internships, both of which were partly funded by Microsoft.

As with the first session, panelists will provide 5-10 minutes of observations, followed by moderated discussion and concluding with Q&A with the audience.

Director
Portland State University Digital City Testbed Center

Manager, Parking Services
City of Surrey

Professor, Computer Science
University of Washington

Parking Director
University of British Columbia

Post-Doctoral Fellow
University of British Columbia 
 




Professor, Electrical Engineering
University of British Columbia

3:15 - 5:00 pm

DATA TRACK - ROOM 126

With the proliferation of new connected services in cities there is an explosion of applications. Many of these applications are based on custom systems that are not interoperable, portable or extensible. NIST and a group of leading standards bodies published the IES-City framework, a distillation of current practices intended to to address these and other challenges including privacy and security. This panel session will discuss these challenges and look at how we can work together to address them.

CEO
urban.systems

CEO
Marketplace.city

Account Executive – Local Government
Esri

Technical Co-Director, MobilityData Program
Rocky Mountain Institute

TRANSPORTATION & MOBILITY - ROOM 128

Ease of mobility has become a serious factor influencing the livability of urban spaces. Developing data-informed, sustainable mobility and transportation plans, policies, and technologies is foundational to urban planning, and essential to improve livability, while ensuring the optimal operation of transportation and other city services.  The following research papers will explore various aspects of data-driven analysis of transportation and mobility networks in urban scenarios, such as multi-scale analysis and modeling, the role of AI, integrated analytics, emergent transportation and mobility paradigms, and more.

E-commerce has facilitated online ordering of goods by households in recent years. This technological advancement has disrupted shopping related transportation. Based on analysis of National Household Travel Survey data, household shopping frequency has declined in the last 10-20 years, while deliveries by parcel delivery trucks and vans have increased. However, the net effect of these phenomena on overall trip making, vehicle-miles traveled (VMT) and fuel consumption has not been quantified. From a regional perspective, understanding the net effect is important for informing city policies—for example, in regards to land use and transportation planning. 

The objective of this research is to address this gap. In this study, the net regional impact of e-commerce on transportation and fuel consumption is evaluated. 
The approach relies on a powerful, agent-based modeling framework (POLARIS) that models decisions made by individual household and commercial agents. E-commerce demand is modeled for each household using a bilevel multinomial probit structure that evaluates e-commerce participation and ordering frequency. Last-mile delivery tours were constructed using GIS-based tools and information from a major parcel delivery company. After integrating the resulting supply and demand models with all other passenger and commercial traffic within POLARIS, a traffic simulation was performed and subsequently VMT and energy consumption were analyzed. 

The study finds that while e-commerce has increased parcel delivery trips, the net effect of e-commerce is a reduction in VMT and fuel consumption due to shopping trip reductions.

Monique Stinson
Annesha Enam
Amy Moore
Joshua Auld

Shifting vehicle drivers to alternate modes is becoming a key focus of city planning groups. Key to understanding how to posit new transit opportunities requires a granular understanding of origin-destination travel demand. By using Mobiliti, a HPC simulation developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that populates origins and destinations and simulates their use of the road network, that granular understanding can be achieved. This data can be used to understand how transit routes serve regional demand and how those services can be improved, an increasingly important aspiration in the face of falling transit ridership, increasing congestion, and environmental concerns. To understand how existing transit routes serve the demand, an origin and destination falling within a half mile of a route were considered zero-transfer transit-feasible; the results of this rudimentary analysis were noteworthy, with simulated feasible ridership up to twenty times higher than actual ridership seen by the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority. Using OpenTripPlanner, we found the average transit trip time to be approximately six times the driving time for that set of transit-feasible trips. This points to a need to increase the operational efficiency of transit services that cannot compete with auto traffic. The second portion of the analysis focuses on understanding how the transit network can be changed to better accommodate the demand. By clustering the origin-destination pairs unserved by the current transit network, corridors of high demand can be visualized, identified, and the demand along that corridor quantified. Public transit is key to cities, and this methodology uses novel data sources to inform the design and development of that oft-overlooked workhorse of urban mobility

Kanaad Deodhar
Colin Laurence
Jane Macfarlane
Joshua Auld

Traffic intersections are often the bottlenecks of traffic systems. Given a traffic network, an optimal traffic signal control strategy can result in smooth traffic flow and thus reduce energy consumption and environmental impact at intersections. This study aims to develop a new multi-input and multi-output (MIMO) traffic signal control method that can improve network-wide traffic operations in terms of delay and energy consumption. In this context, a 35-intersection network of Bellevue, WA is used as the basis for the development of the algorithm, where modeling and intersection controls in a globalized setting are established using MIMO linear control theory and high matrix formulation. The proposed control method is evaluated in a microscopic traffic simulation environment, VISSIM. Simulation results show that the proposed method has much shorter average travel delays in the network when compared with the delays of conventional pretimed and actuated controls.

Hong Wang
Chieh Wang
Meixin Zhu
Wanshi Hong

The revolution brought up by digitization has lifted world into new dimension. Apprehending the changes, Itahari sub metropolitan city has incorporated digitization in its work procedure for improving efficiency, productivity and service delivery. In the journey to create cloud friendly mechanism and digitally knowledgeable citizen, we have been working and educating the city residents simultaneously. 
This paper highlights the strength, effectiveness and result of local government brought up after the incorporation of e-governance in service delivery. As a fastest growing economic city of our country, we opt for self improvement as a result of minimal environment and high economic impact. We aspire to integrate smart data and smart transportation system in our city in days to come through Internet of Things (IOT) and digitization. However, at present the existing low literacy rate and neglected digital knowledge among the residents of the city hinders the proper acceptance of cloud computing system. Various skill development activities and training are on practice to increase the recognition of the system by general public. Advantage over time and cost has created synergy and support to work according to vision of organization and we seek to increase the digital dependency. We are exercising digitization for vital registration, revenue collection, store management, and for overall budget allocation. Uniformity is maintained among all twenty wards through fiber cable and software. Monitoring is mechanized through complain box and through CCTV cameras in all wards which is accessible to head office. 
As a nearest customer contact, this sub metropolitan city operates on Smart, Effective and Timely service with the principle of fraternity, equality and social justice.

Prakriti Chaulagain

THRIVING COMMUNITIES TRACK - ROOM 122

Associate Professor
University of Portland

Principal/Executive Director
Bridges Middle School

Clinical & Organizational Psychologist
Sustainable Self

 

Research Forester
US Forest Service

Executive Director
The Intertwine Alliance

Smart City PDX Coordinator/Air Quality Lead
City of Portland

Associate Professor Urban Studies & Planning
Portland State University

DATA SUPERCLUSTER - ROOM 138

DSC is a GCTC Supercluster developing a Blueprint / Guide for Data that encourages innovation, open development and sharing. New technologies including crypto-data-ledgers, advanced multi-factor authentication, application of security and privacy, authorization in free, licensed and closed-group data sets of interest to the discussion group. The discussion will touch on these topics as well as methods that leading Smart Communities have put into place to benefit their residents, businesses, community leaders and stakeholders.
 
This is a working group session, with interactive, audience participation. Your opportunity to share your experience, storries, challenages, and successes will take place during this session.

Co-Chair
NIST SC3 GCTC Supercluster on Data
C0-Founder
Aspen.ai

Director of SMC Public Wi-Fi
County of San Mateo

CEO
Adaptable Security

Portfolio Manager, Cyber Security Division, Science & Technology Directorate
U.S. Department of Homeland Security

HACK OREGON DEMO DAY

5:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Hack Oregon will unveil five new data applications at the Smart Cities Global Tech Jam conference with city leaders from around the world.  Everyone is welcome, and we want a full house to support our teams!  As always, it’s a live interactive stage presentation including a friendly competition with an audience vote for the team with the winning story collection. 

This year’s data application themes are:

  • Disaster Resilience
  • Education
  • Elections
  • Housing
  • Transportation

REGISTER HERE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12th

BREAKOUT SESSIONS 5

8:00 AM - 9:45 AM

TRANSPORTATION & MOBILITY - ROOM 138

For years we’ve been talking about Connected and Autonomous Vehicles together in one statement and even one acronym of CAV. Yet as the industry has evolved, many in both the Public and Private sector have tended to focus on one or the other, between Connected and Autonomous, and the two paths seem to be disconnected and potentially even diverging. 

Join this discussion about the importance of Public Sector investment in Connected infrastructure and the necessary linking of Connected Vehicle technology to make Autonomous Vehicle safe, effective and efficient. This panel will be moderated by Adrian Pearmine, the. The panel will bring together representatives from the automotive industry, the communications industry and the public sector, representing transportation engineering and operations, to discuss the issues that have been driving the divergence of this conversation and the importance of bringing them back together. While OEMs and the technology industry driving Autonomous Vehicle development have needed to press on with development of their solutions, assuming that vehicles will be able to migrate to “self-driving” technology completely utilizing their own set of sensors, they will never be as safe or as efficient as they can be if they aren’t also Connected Vehicles. The challenges, both regulatory and technical, that have slowed the development of Connected Vehicles have been significant. But the full benefits of AVs will never be realized if the vehicles aren’t both Connected and Autonomous, so we need to focus on how to bring this back together. Come engage in the important conversation of “putting the C back in CAV!”

modeling, mobility, and data will be presented.

Patrick Marnell
Project Manager
Intelight

Jane Macfarlane
Director of Smart Cities
University of California at Berkeley

Adrian Pearmine
National Director for Smart Cities and Connected Vehicles
DKS Associates

Eric Thorn
Manager R&D, Cooperative Systems Section
Southwest Research Institute

9:00 AM - 11:00 A-PM

Interested in finding out what a Smart Building is and how it relates to municipalities and urban design? The Smart Buildings Super Cluster (SBSC) is working on a blueprint to help answer these questions.  This gathering will be a workshop discussion to:

  • Discuss how smart buildings can support smart cities – projects, uses cases and general brainstorming
  • Review the SBSC Blueprint outline and provide feedback
  • Brainstorm on what else would be of value to include in the Blueprint
  • Brainstorm about other types of information and tools that would be of value
  • Review purpose and audience for the SBSC overall and the Blueprint and other tools

We look forward to joining you in the discussion!

 

Discussion moderated by: Limor Schafman, TIA and SBSC Co-Chair

The second part of this session will build on powerful observation, recognition and recommendations by men and women in our Smart Secure Cities and Communities Challenge. For the success of Smart Secure Cities and Communities Challenge and happiness of our children and grandchildren, these men and women declared “we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all People are created equal, that they are endowed with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness, that Smart Secure Cities and Communities offer an unprecedented opportunity of freeing ingrained gender bias in design and implementation to fulfill the unalienable Rights, that seize the opportunity we will to improve equality and equity for half of the world’s population, women.

Join the discussion to share your thoughts:
Is this an unnecessary distraction from key success factors?
Is now high time to address the issue?

Strategic Communications
Marcus Consulting Group

Global Community Manager
Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology

Strategy and Technology- Enterprise PLM
CommScope, Inc

Principal
Metropolitan Intelligence
Co-Founder SmartOakland.org

Founder
Journalism Accelerator
Communication Strategist / Journalist

Global Community Manager
Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology

9:00 AM - 11:00 AM

TRANSPORTATION & MOBILITY - ROOM 132

Research Scientist and Group Manager
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Advisor
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Research Scientist and Group Manager
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Jane Macfarlane
Director of Smart Cities
University of California at Berkeley

Senior R&D Staff
Vehicle Systems Research Group
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Vehicle and Mobility Group Manager
Argonne National Laboratory

Researcher
NREL

Increasing populations, new modes of on-demand transportation and changing demand patterns for goods deliveries in our cities is crippling our transportation infrastructure. In 2018, the US had three cities in the top five congested cities in the world – which accounts for a collective economic cost of $62B for just these three cities.Designing transportation solutions for real-world urban scale systems has mostly been accomplished with very limited analytics because of the very complex dynamics and interacting constraints that effect this flow of goods and travelers. New large-scale computational capabilities (e.g. cloud computing and supercomputing), data analytics (e.g machine learning and intelligent data compression) and modeling (e.g. dynamic traffic assignment and agent-based modeling) that scales in both time and space are now possible. By combining data from real-world sensors and very large road network models, both optimization analytics and emergent behaviors from large scale agent models can be used to build our understanding of urban scale problems.

Jane Macfarlane
Director of Smart Cities
University of California at Berkeley

QUICK LOOK AGENDA

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10

9:00 am
DAY ONE WELCOME

9:15 am – 1:00 pm
DAY ONE PLENARY SESSIONS

1:00 – 3:00 pm
BREAKOUT SESSIONS 1

3:15 pm – 5:00 pm
BREAKOUT SESSIONS 2

5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
EXHIBITION & POSTER RECEPTION

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11

9:00 am
WELCOME

9:15 am – 11:00 am
DAY TWO PLENARY SESSIONS

11:00 am – 1:00 pm
LIGHTING TALKS

1:00 – 3:00 pm
BREAKOUT SESSIONS 3

3:15 pm – 5:00 pm
BREAKOUT SESSIONS 4

5:30 pm – 8:00 pm
HACK OREGON DEMO DAY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12th

9:00 am – 11:00 am
BREAKOUT SESSIONS 5

11:00 am – 1:00 pm
BREAKOUT SESSIONS 6